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OL-26, 1st Combat Evaluation Group, Binh Thuy AB, RVN mid-1970

OL-26 (call sign GAP) was deeply involved with the secret bombing in Cambodia, well before Kent State and afterwards. While one might argue successfully that Nixon's coverups- the targeting data was falsified to reflect that the targets were in South Vietnam -  were designed to hide the bombing from the US Congress, and were probably illegal, the fact remains that especially after the 'incursion' into Cambodia in May 1970, hostile action against US and RVN forces in the south dropped off dramatically. 

OL-26; and OL-21 (call sign MACON) at Bien Hoa were responsible for Arc Light activity against Cambodian targets in the Parrot's Beak and the Fishhook during the incursion, as well as in the months preceding Nixon's 'coming out of the Cambodian closet'. 

In addition to Arc Light strikes in Cambodia and  RVN's IV Corps, OL-26 also worked with Royal Australian Air Force B57 Canberras (call-sign MAGPIE) from Phan Rang AB and USAF F-100's primarily out of Tuy Hoa AB.

Ol-26 closed late in 1970.

Photos of OL-26, early 1970, at the time of the Cambodian incursion.

CHECO Report on Air Support in the Fishhook and Parrot's Beak

See "Call Sign Rustic: The Secret Air War Over Cambodia, 1970-1973" by Richard Wood, Smithsonian Institution Press. This work has little to do with COMBAT SKYSPOT or B-52's, but it is an excellent reference on this part of the war in Southeast Asia.

See also http://www.yale.edu/cgp/us.html, and http://www.yale.edu/cgp/maplicity.html, which links to an excellent searchable database.

After the Cambodian incursion:

“I want this done. Now that is one thing that can turn this around some. They are running these Goddamn milk runs in order to get the Air Medal. You know what they are doing, Henry. It’s horrible what the Air Force is doing. They aren’t doing anything at all worth a damn.”

“The whole Goddamn Air Force is over there farting around doing nothing and I have watched that stuff and they aren’t doing a thing. I mean they get one or two trucks a day and fly 800 sorties and get 1500 Air Medals. You know that’s all it is. It’s awful.”

         -Conversation between Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, 9 December 1970.

How we came to bomb Cambodia:Transcript of conversation between Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, 9 December 1970.

Continuing the brilliant leadership:Transcript of conversation between Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig, 9 December 1970.

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